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Good practice guide to enjoy the footpaths during the hunting season

We have delayed dealing with this issue because having hunters and hikers in the same area is a matter for debate ... Although lots of hunters are also hikers.

It's not our aim to cause controversy or take sides for or against the practice; but simply to review the basics to enjoy the trails safely together this autumn.

Let's remember first of all that we are dealing here with hunting under permit, regulating the species and number of individuals that can be hunted; to ensure the sustainable management of wildlife in a given territory (and not poaching).

 

Focus on 4 positive behaviours to adopt together from September:

1/ Be visible

Stay on the trails where you will be more easily identifiable and wear visible clothes (avoid khakis and browns; this season, opt instead for bright colours).

If you don't have suitable clothing, a bib can also help.

If you have a dog, it's recommended to keep it on a leash.

2/ Take note of signs

Drive hunts are often indicated by signs. If you come across one, follow the instructions given: make a detour, keep silent, wait for it all to end etc.

3/ Talk to the hunters

The best option if you come across hunters is to ask them about the area being hunted, current activity and the right thing to do. This way, you can ensure maximum safety for everyone, without disturbing what they're doing or preventing you from hiking.

4/ Respect the hunt

They don't usually last all day.

It's best to avoid crossing their path but, if you must, gather your group and go ahead together, staying on the path. Make yourself known in advance and stay on the same side as the hunters. Avoid stopping along the way (it's better to stop a few metres further on) and try to keep as quiet as possible.

 

Feel free to share your own personal advice (in good will) to help the community ... And enjoy the autumn colours!

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